Notebooks – Resources

Tammy:

resources

Originally posted on Wildflowers and Marbles:


Please visit — Notebooks – Acquiring Habits of Intellectual Effort — if you haven’t read it yet. It contains a distillation of my thoughts on the foundational ideas from Charlotte Mason on her notebooks.  The following are simply resources and links that have been of use in our own home as we work in our notebooks – toward “acquiring habits of intellectual effort”.  {CM, Volume 5}


History Resources

Pens – We use Pigma Micron pens in various sizes for our work in our notebooks.  We use different sizes, but the older student (that would be working in the Book of Centuries) appreciates the very, very fine point of an 005 (.20 mm) point pen.  This is a great assorted size set which we like because it has a good size/fit for everyone and every need.

Book of Centuries – I have been earnestly searching for the format described…

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Notebooks – Acquiring Habits with Intellectual Effort

Tammy:

So much good information

Originally posted on Wildflowers and Marbles:


This post originally began as a book discussion introduction.  If you arrived here looking for the original book discussion it is no longer retained (at the book author’s express wish). What remains are my thoughts and the ideas that sprung from Charlotte Mason’s writing on her notebooks as found in her 6 volumes and also from PNEU Programmes of study.

Will the mothers who are doing this {Mother’s Education} course make it their duty to hand on the knowledge they get, as they get it, to {other} mothers…whether in the way of asking a few mothers to tea and chat, or in talk with a single mother in the course of cottage visits, or in mothers’ meetings; anyway will they make “pass on” their watchword.”

Charlotte Mason, 1897, as written to the members of her Mother’s Educational Course

I hope I preserved ideas to “pass on” that are worthy of sharing.  Resources and…

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God Has a Wonderful Plan for Your …. Eternity.

Copied from an email I received from a friend after a conversation about this very topic. God’s timing is perfect.

 

 

 

There is never been a time in my life that I needed to be reminded of this than at this moment.

 

If I’ve heard it once, I’ve heard it a million times:(I’ve even said it many times)

God has a wonderful plan for your life.

 

Tell this to a grieving mother standing beside a gaping grave dug for her child.  Tell it to a man who can’t keep the voices away, who longs to be normal but can’t will his mind to function properly.  Tell it to a woman who was raped.  Tell it to a child while he is being cut into pieces and suctioned from his mother’s womb.

I understand the sentiment behind what we are saying when we use this phrase.  But, my friends, look around you.  A great many people live lives full of sorrow, tragedy, horror, pain, and abuse.

 

Where is God in all this? the seeker will ask.  What does God have to do with the pain and the sorrow in this world?

Why, everything.

 

He sees, He cares, He knows, and, yes, His will reigns supreme.  This world is broken.  We are broken people.  God told us this would be so.  He never promised a wonderful life.  In fact, He promised hardship.  Jesus said the poor will be blessed.  But, He didn’t say He would end poverty.  He said those who mourn will be comforted.  But, He never promised that mourning wouldn’t be part of our lives.

 

Life is hard, even when you’re a Christian.  Even when you try to love God with all your heart, bad things will happen.  Terrible things will come.  And, this is the danger in telling each other God has a wonderful plan for your life.  Because there are just too many moments and hours and days and weeks that don’t feel like a wonderful plan.  They feel like an awful plan.  They feel like a devastating plan.  And, in those moments, the wonderful life idea just rings hollow.  It makes us mad at God.  It makes us resent Him and it leads us to believe that He was lying when He said,  I have a wonderful plan for your life.

Only He never said that.  We have confused something well-meaning Christians have repeated millions of times with something that God actually promised.  Yes, someone has been lying to you, but it’s not God.

 

Here’s the truth of the matter:  If you are a Christian, God has a wonderful plan for your eternity.  Jesus promised that He is getting some pretty amazing (dare I say wonderful) stuff ready for you in Heaven.  And, He is coming back to Earth to do a whole new wonderful thing someday.

 

God has a plan for your life on earth, too.  But, it’s not for a 100% wonderful existence.  That was the garden of Eden.  Times have changed.  Our lives on earth will be trying, difficult, sometimes tragic, sometimes almost unbearable, often sprinkled with lots of great times, truly amazing and awe-inspiring experiences, and love.  And all of these things, good and bad, bring glory to God, can help us know Him more, can bring us to our knees, can take us sailing to heights we’ve never known before.  The human existence is a roller coaster of fear, doubt, happiness, pain, fun, beauty, anger, grace, mercy, anguish, and brokenness.  God gives wonderful moments.  But, this life isn’t always wonderful.

 

Learn to be okay with that.  Learn that God does what He does for reasons you can’t always see or understand.  Learn to believe that God is good, even when the un-wonderful of life creeps in.

 

This life is only one stitch in the infinite and intricate fabric of eternity.  There is so much wonderful waiting for us in that forever.  Until then, God loves you, and He has a plan for your life.  Whatever it is, don’t lose faith when wonderful seems miles away.  Even when the circumstances of life aren’t wonderful, our God still is.

~ Melissa Edgington

He passed!

Spence has worked so hard over the last three weeks studying for his Hunter Safety Education class. Today that hard work paid off. It was a very long weekend for kids and adults, but tonight he passed the test and will receive his New Mexico hunting license!

I’m so proud of him!

Off To A Good Start

After a two-week Christmas break, we are back into a homeschool routine. We are upping our game this semester, so subjects are being tweaked or added.  After putting all our energy for three semesters into catching up with reading and math, we are expanding the skill areas and tweaking our content areas. (Skill areas = reading, math, writing; Content areas = history and science)

I’ve added a lot of drill to our math program. We are pushing the boundaries in reading. And I’ve added a formal writing curriculum to the day. That will be the biggest stumbling block for Spence as he is pencil-phobic, but it would also be his greatest weakness if he had to go back to public school right now. Time to fix that.

We are adding a formal spelling program, a typing program, and Spanish to the day as well as refocusing our grammar studies.

Spence is also spending at least an hour a day with Daddy studying for his hunter safety certificate, which is required for any New Mexico resident who wants a hunting license. The course is NOT designed for 10-year-olds, so he has to work extra hard. Keeping my fingers crossed that he can pass the test!

Here’s my not-so-little hunter:

Is it possible to get a decent picture from a 10-year-old boy???? The goofy grins! The silly poses! Oy!

14 Days of Homeschooling

To the tune of “Twelve Days of Christmas”

On the first day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “Can you homeschool legally?”

On the second day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “Are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the third day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “Do you give them tests, are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the fourth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “What about P.E., do you give them tests, are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the fifth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “YOU ARE SO STRANGE! What about P.E., do you give them tests, are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the sixth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “How long will you homeschool, YOU ARE SO STRANGE, what about P.E. , do you give them tests, are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the seventh day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “Look at what they’re missing, how long will you homeschool, YOU ARE SO STRANGE!, what about P.E., do you give them tests, are they socialized, do you homeschool legally?”

On the eighth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “Why do you do this, look at what they’re missing, how long will you homeschool, YOU ARE SO STRANGE!, what about P.E. do you give them tests, are they socialized, do you homeschool legally?”

On the ninth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “They’ll miss the prom, why do you do this, look at what they’re missing, how long will you homeschool, YOU ARE SO STRANGE!, what about P.E. do you give them tests, are they socialized, do you homeschool legally?”

On the tenth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “What about graduation, they’ll miss the prom, why do you do this, look at what they’re missing, how long will you homeschool, YOU ARE SO STRANGE!, what about P.E., do you give them tests, are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the eleventh day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “I could never do that, what about graduation, they’ll miss the prom, why do you do this, look at what they’re missing, how long will you homeschool, YOU ARE SO STRANGE!, what about P.E., do you give them tests, are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the twelfth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “Can they go to college, I could never do that, what about graduation, they’ll miss the prom, why do you do this, look at what they’re missing, how long will you homeschool, YOU ARE SO STRANGE!, what about P.E., do you give them tests, are they socialized, can you homeschool legally?”

On the thirteenth day of homeschool I thoughtfully replied: “They can go to college, yes you can do this, they can have graduation, we don’t like the prom, we do it cuz we like it, they are missing nothing, we’ll homeschool forever, WE ARE NOT STRANGE!, we give them P.E., and we give them tests, they are socialized, AND WE HOMESCHOOL LEGALLY!”

On the fourteenth day of homeschool my neighbor said to me, “How can I get started, why didn’t you tell me, where do I buy curriculum, when is the next conference, WILL PEOPLE THINK WE’RE STRANGE?, I think we can do this, if you will help us, we’ll join a sports team, and we’ll homeschool legally.”

Eruption!

 

Building the volcano – plaster tape

Painting the volcano – gotta have a lake too, Mom!

Time to erupt!

If you click HERE, you can see video of Spence erupting his volcano. A little baking soda, a little food color + vinegar, a little magic for a boy! (I’ll apologize for my video skills in advance. Small camera; unsteady mom) That crackling is our never-ending New Mexico wind!

The Necessary

The moans! The groans! The drama!

Why? Why do I have to . . . . *insert despised curricular activities*

Why do I have to write spelling words?

Why must I identify prepositional phrases/subjects/verbs?

Why do I need to learn to write good sentences?

 

So that we can get to the fun stuff, my son.

Up next: The Making of a Volcano

Monet in the Making

Spence and I have been fortunate to hook up with two other homeschooling families in our neighborhood. Our three families have formed a little art study co-op. We meet twice a month to learn about famous artists and their works, do a little painting, and eat a snack.

During September, we’ve learned about Claude Monet and discussed the Impressionist movement. In the first meeting, we learned about picture study – we all silently studied the picture for 30-40 seconds and then turned it over. We went around the circle, each of us naming a detail we noticed in the picture. Then we painted and ate faux chocolate mousse (pudding with cool whip).

The assignment was to draw a tree with a hay-filled wheelbarrow below. Spence decided he’d draw Grandaddy’s farm instead.

Notice the snow/rain mix and the snow-covered deer. Hey, he is sooo not an artsy kid – I was just glad to see him put paint to paper!

Today we discussed more Monet, specifically the use of loads of paint and the lack details. Our assignment was to recreate Monet’s bridge in a Japanese garden using masking tape resist. We laid down low-tack masking tape for the bridge and painted the vegetation around it. Then we removed the tape, revealing the bridge amidst the water lilies.

Logan, being 13 AND a boy, deviated from the plan. His picture included paratroopers and sharks! The blue masking tape blends in with the water, but you can see his bridge in the center. The blue vertical stripes are bridge posts.

Ten-year-old Lacey’s picture:

Eight-year-old Jake’s picture:

Eleven-year-old Jordan’s picture:

Spence was absent as he went to Albuquerque with his dad today. (I taught the painting part of the lesson, so my presence was mandatory.)

After painting we ate! Depending on who you ask, that may have been the best part of the meeting!

Speaking Life Into Our Children

I read this today on a message board for followers of the Five in a Row curriculum. We do not currently use FIAR, but it is a wonderful curriculum that I’d highly recommend to anyone homeschooling younger children.

Steve Lambert (publisher of FIAR) is talking about a book he and his wife are reading aloud together….

(The book) we’re reading at the moment is “Velma Still Cooks in Leeway” by Vinita Hampton Wright.

I was taken by these words a couple of days ago as we were reading together…

“When I was twelve, I began creating my own recipes while Gran Lenny worked. Lunchtime would come, and I’d set a plate in front of her. After we had eaten, she would either tell me, ‘Write this one down, Vellie’ or ‘This needs some adjusting.’ To her, words and cooking required the same kind of skill and care. There was a difference between marjoram and rosemary, and that difference could mean success or not. There was a difference between ‘blueness streaming down the sky’ and ‘bluish streaks in the clouds,’ and because that difference was important to Gran Lenny it became important to me.

I never became gifted with words, as Gran Lenny was. But when I was fourteen and had prepared dinner for Aunt Trudy and Cousin Elizabeth and others who had traveled to have Easter dinner at our table, Gran Lenny announced, ‘Velma is a chef, and the rest of us are merely cooks.’ For a long, glorious, fearful moment, all eyes turned to me, little Velie who wasn’t much to look at and who was generally shy, and they smiled. And my father raised his hands and applauded.

The others followed him, smiling brightly. I giggled, and then I started to cry and left the table. I heard Papa say with a chuckle, ‘Lenora, you’ve embarrassed her.’

‘She’ll live through it.’ Gran Lenny had returned to her pretense of being annoyed with all of us. But after that, and ever since, I’ve cooked as though I were a chef. A person’s words have the power to create, not only on paper, but in another human being. Gran Lenny helped God that day to create me. I was born again in a way different from being born again at the altar of the church. Gran Lenny had rebirthed me. That’s what it felt like at least. I do believe that I’m still living as the person I became that evening.”

What we say to our children makes a difference in ways we’ll never fully understand. Speak life to your children today.

 

Boy, have I needed a reminder that I should be speaking life to my son instead of condemnation. We are going through a trying time with an entitled and rebellious spirit. My words are not helping the situation, I fear. This week I will practice speaking life.